2017 SUStainable urban systems Symposium

The 2017 Stanford Sustainable Urban Systems Symposium took place on June 8. See highlights and details below; recordings of the talks are coming soon.

program Agenda

  • 8:00am - Light Breakfast
  • 8:30am - Welcome 
    • Lynn Hildemann, Department Chair, Civil & Environmental Engineering
    • Jim Leckie, Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering
    • Bruce Cain, Director, Bill Lane Center for the American West
  • 9:00am - Panel Discussion: Resilience
    • Christine Thomson, AICP, LEED AP, Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill
    • Laszlo Varga, Architect, Sherwood Design Engineers
    • Rob Best, Engineer, Arup
    • Jim Stickley, ASLA, LEED AP, Principal, WRT
    • Moderator: Jack Baker, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering
  • 10:30am - Panel Discussion: Sustainability 
    • Gil Friend, Chief Sustainability Officer, Palo Alto
    • Peter Pirnejad, Development Services Director, Palo Alto
    • Egon Terplan, Regional Planning Director, SPUR
    • Melissa Lunden, Chief Scientist, Aclima
    • Rishee Jain, Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering
    • Moderator: Michael Lepech, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering
  • 12:00pm - Lunch 
  • 1:00pm - Panel Discussion: Well-Being 
    • Jesus Andrade, Councilmember, District 6, Stockton
    • Fred Sheil, Executive Director, STAND Affordable Housing
    • Dana Harvey, Executive Director, Mandela Marketplace
    • Nancy Huante, Parent/Family Organizing Director, South Stockton Schools Initiative
    • Hector Lara, Director, Reinvent South Stockton Coalition
    • Moderator: Michelle Anderson, Professor, Law School
  • 2:30pm - Student Presentation: Sichuan University, China 
  • 3:30pm - Student Presentation: Monterrey, Mexico 
  • 4:30pm - Poster Reception 

featured speakers

Dr. Lynn Hildemann, Department Chair, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Stanford

Lynn Hildemann's current research areas include the sources and dispersion of indoor aerosols, the physicochemical properties of organic aerosols, and assessment of human exposure to PM.  Prof. Hildemann received BS, MS, and PhD degrees in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. She is an author on >80 peer-reviewed publications, including three with over 700 citations each, and another 16 with over 100 citations each. She has been honored with Young Investigator Awards from NSF and ONR, the Kenneth T. Whitby Award from the AAAR (1998), and Stanford's Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (2013); she also was a co-recipient of Atmospheric Environment’s Haagen-Smit Outstanding Paper Award (2001). She has served on advisory committees for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and for the California Air Resources Board. She has been an Associate Editor for Environmental Science & Technology, and Aerosol Science and Technology. She currently is on the advisory board for the journal Environmental Science & Technology. At Stanford, Prof. Hildemann is currently chair of the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering. She has chaired the School of Engineering Library Committee and the University Committee on Judicial Affairs, and serves as an elected member of the University Faculty Senate.

Dr. James Leckie, Director, Center for Sustainable Development & Global Competitiveness, Stanford

Professor James O. Leckie is the C.L. Peck, Class of 1906, Professor of Environmental Engineering and Geological and Environmental Sciences (by courtesy) at Stanford University. He is also Director of the Center for Sustainable Development & Global Competitiveness and Director of the Stanford Environmental & Water Studies Summer Program. His research interests include computational intelligence for smart physical and social infrastructure, using computational learning and optimization tools to (1) better design smart physical infrastructure (transportation systems, urban water systems), and (2) facilitate a class of social services such as knowledge management for social innovation, to integrate social functionality into urban communities. Dr. Leckie has led the Sustainable Urban Systems Initiative for the last two years.

Dr. Bruce Cain, Director, Bill Lane Center for the American West, Stanford

The distinguished political scientist Bruce E. Cain is the Spence and Cleone Eccles Family Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West, and Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in Humanities and Sciences. Professor Cain succeeded the Center's founding faculty co-director, David M. Kennedy, and is tasked with carrying on the Center's study of the past, present and future of the American West. Professor Cain brings a wealth of experience in U.S. and California politics. A pioneer in computer-assisted redistricting, he is a well-known expert on elections, term limits, polling, and the relationships between lobbyists and elected officials. He is a frequently cited source in media coverage of politics. 

Christine Thomson, AICP, LEED AP, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Christine Scott Thomas, AICP, LEED AP, is a senior urban planner in SOM’s San Francisco office providing management, planning and design assistance on a variety of projects including waterfront redevelopment, river corridors, campus and community, and urban districts with a focus on sustainability. She has over twenty years of environmental planning and design experience leading community planning and urban revitalization projects, and she specializes in identifying opportunities to use green site design and building strategies in planning projects. Christine is a Certified Planner, a LEED accredited professional and a member of the American Planning Association. She is also a regular presenter at Local and National green building conferences specializing in the topic of sustainable communities. Christine has been recognized as a member of the 2011 team of finalists in the Kaiser Permanente Small Hospital, Big Idea Design Competition and 2004 winning team of the USGBC International Design Competition.

Laszlo Varga, Architect, Sherwood Design Engineers

László Varga is an architect, urbanist and entrepreneur based in the Bay Area, California. He has held the post of Campus Architect at Google in its Mountain View headquarters in California with responsibility for strategic developments of Google’s real estate portfolio from 2014 to 2016. László has worked with some leading European architectural practices and has been involved in a leading capacity on a wide range of urban, masterplanning and architectural projects across Europe and the US, including Google’s Dublin Headquarters, Waze’s Tel Aviv offices and Publicis’ new London Headquarters. He has been a lecturer and guest critic at the University of East London, the University of Nottingham, University of Westminster, The Bartlett UCL, London Metropolitan University and Columbia University.

Dr. Rob Best, Engineer, Arup

Rob Best has a Ph.D in Sustainable Design and Construction from the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at Stanford University and currently works at Arup. His research focused on network planning, integration, and optimization of urban infrastructure systems. He has a B.S. in Engineering from Harvey Mudd College and an M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford. He was the Design and Construction Manager for the Stanford Solar Decathlon Team, a student-driven project to build a net-zero energy home. In 2010-2011, as a Thomas J. Watson Fellow, Rob researched the socioeconomic and political conditions that foster eco-city development worldwide. He also has experience as a consultant modeling the energy consumption of buildings and urban developments and evaluating the long-term impacts of pollution and hazardous industries.

Jim Stickley, ASLA, LEED AP, Principal, WRT

Jim Stickley is a landscape architect and urban designer with over 30 years of experience in community design and planning. His work on a number of complex projects has spanned the full spectrum from large-scale urban and campus planning assignments to detailed design and implementation of campuses, streets, parks, and urban landscapes. Jim has extensive experience in developing plans to enhance urban districts, public open space and campus environments. His work strives to help communities balance socio-economic, cultural and ecological factors to create unique places, rooted in the community’s cultural identity and ecological realities.

Dr. Jack Baker, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Stanford

Prof. Baker joined the Stanford faulty in 2006 from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), where he was a visiting researcher in the Department of Structural Engineering. He has degrees in Structural Engineering (Stanford, M.S. 2002, Ph.D. 2005), Statistics (Stanford, M.S. 2004) and Mathematics/Physics (Whitman College, B.A. 2000). He has industry experience in seismic hazard assessment, ground motion selection, probabilistic risk assessment, and modeling of catastrophe losses for insurance and reinsurance companies. He is a co-founder and technical advisor for Haselton Baker Risk Group, LLC.

gil friend.jpg

Gil Friend, Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Palo Alto

Gil is charged to "develop a world class sustainability strategy for the city, and manage the activities that will lead Palo Alto be being the greenest city in America." He is widely considered one of the founders of the sustainable business movement. Gil is a named inaugural member of the Sustainability Hall of Fame (along with Amory Lovins, Karl-Henrik Robert, Bob Willard and the late Ray Anderson) by the International Society of Sustainability Professionals, and "one of the 10 most influential sustainability voices in America" by The Guardian. Gil is a systems ecologist and business strategist with over 40 years experience in business & policy innovation. As founder & CEO of Natural Logic Inc, he helped companies in a wide range of industries design, implement and measure profitable sustainability strategies. Gil's work combines broad business experience in management consulting, business strategy, systems ecology, economic development, management cybernetics, and public policy. 

 

Peter Pirnejad, Development Services Director, City of Palo Alto

Dr. Peter Pirnejad is Development Services Director at the City of Palo Alto. He is an award winning community development professional with over 18 years of experience in local government related to land use and is best known for leadership in civic technology, performance measurements, civic-engagement, leading policies around green and energy efficient buildings, implementation of data-driven lean government practices, and an ability to foster cross-jurisdictional teams with a focus on collaborative governance. Peter also serves in, and was formerly the president of, the League of California Cities Planning Department. Prior to Palo Alto, his career included work in the cities of Daly City (San Mateo County), Lodi (San Joaquin County), and Westlake Village (Los Angeles County). Peter currently holds a Doctorate in Planning, Policy, and Development and a Masters in Planning and Development Services both from the University of Southern California; his dissertation was on Collaborative Governance.

Egon Terplan, Regional Planning Director, SPUR

Egon Terplan is SPUR's regional planning director. He is a specialist in economic development, land use, transportation, government reform and regional policy. He has authored or co-authored dozens of reports and policy studies, including the first-ever report on the Northern California megaregion, a report on land use planning and high speed rail, a strategy for improving economic opportunity and upward mobility in the Bay Area, and strategies for the future of downtown Oakland, San Jose and San Francisco. Egon is a frequent speaker and lecturer and also teaches in the Urban Affairs graduate program at the University of San Francisco.

Dr. Melissa Lunden, Chief Scientist, Aclima

Dr. Melissa Lunden is an Atmospheric Scientist and Chief Scientist at Aclima. She received her Ph.D. at the California Institute of Technology with an emphasis on aerosol formation and structure. Previously she worked at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory directing investigations of environmental processes across a wide variety of locations including the Sierra Nevada forests, traffic tunnels, and the Washington, D.C and Boston subway systems.

 

Dr. Rishee Jain, Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering

Professor Jain's research focuses on the development of data-driven and socio-technical solutions to sustainability problems facing the urban built environment. His work lies at the intersection of civil engineering, data analytics and social science. Recently, his research has focused on understanding the socio-spatial dynamics of commercial building energy usage, conducting data-driven benchmarking and sustainability planning of urban buildings and characterizing the coupled dynamics of urban systems using data science and micro-experimentation. For more information, see the active projects on the Stanford Urban Informatics Lab website.

Dr. Michael Lepech, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering

Professor Lepech's research focuses on the integration of sustainability indicators into engineering design, ranging from materials design, structural design, system design, to operations management. Such sustainability indicators include a comprehensive set of environmental, economic, and social costs. Recently his research has focused on the design of sustainable high performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs) and fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs), the impacts of sustainable materials on building and infrastructure design and operation, and the development of new life cycle assessment (LCA) applications for building systems, transportation systems, water systems, consumer products. Along with this he is studying the effects that slowly diffusing sustainable civil engineering innovations, and the social networks they diffuse through, can have on achieving long term sustainability goals.

Jesús Andrade, District 6 Councilmember, City of Stockton

Jesús Andrade was recently elected to represent the 6th District on the Stockton City Council. Jesús's goals are to create new economic development opportunities for low-income and middle class residents in his district, and to work with the Mayor's office to improve K-12 literacy rates and college-going rates across the city. 

 

Fred Sheil, Executive Director, STAND Affordable Housing

Fred is the Administrator for STAND, a 25 year old Southeast Stockton neighborhood based nonprofit that works on Community Policing, Affordable Housing and Neighborhood Activities. Fred has studied and worked in international and community development for 38 years. Many like to believe that poverty and crime causes blighted neighborhoods. Wrong. The true cause is municipal neglect in the form of weak code enforcement, absent legal action against slumlords, and lack of public investment in housing in these areas. Our mission is to reverse this decline.

Dana Harvey, Executive Director, Mandela MarketPlace

For over a decade Ms. Harvey has guided the development and growth of an award winning non-profit organization, Mandela MarketPlace, to create an alternative, community-driven food access and economic development model that integrates local entrepreneurship, business incubation, nutrition education, and access to healthy, fresh and affordable foods. Under her direction and leadership, Mandela MarketPlace incubated a for-profit, worker-owned grocery retail, Mandela Foods Cooperative, a Healthy Retail Program, Zella’s Soulful Kitchen, Mandela Foods Distribution, and Ladder Up Finance Fund and Entrepreneurship training programs. These programs have generated over $5M in new revenue, distributed over 600,000 lbs of local, fresh produce into a community that previously had no access, created over 25 sustained jobs and business owners, and provide job and business training to tens of residents annually, and increased local farmer income by more than $250,000. Ms. Harvey holds a B.S. Degree in Conservation Ecology and Natural Resource Economics, and an M.S. Degree in Soil Science/Sustainable Agriculture from UC Berkeley. She received the 2009 Women of Greatness Award from Mayor Dellums, 2010 Robert Wood Johnson Community Health Leader Award and was recognized by President Obama as a 2012 Champion of Change in Food Security. She attributes her systems thinking approach to her community, her education and a lifetime connection with nature.

Dr. Nancy Huante-Tzintzun, Parent/Family Organizing Director, South Stockton Schools Initiative

Nancy Huante-Tzintzun was born in Zacapu, Michoacan Mexico but grew up in Stockton, California. With the encouragement of family and mentors, she got into Sacramento State University where she studied Ethnic Studies and Sociology. Passionate about social justice education, Chicana/o Latina/o history, and teaching she decided to pursue graduate school to become a college professor in Ethic Studies and Education. She received her MA in Chican@ Studies from San Diego State University. Her research interests include but are not limited to Chicana Feminist Epistemologies, Decolonial Feminist Theory, Curandera Praxis, U.S. Third World Feminisms, Community-based learning, Ethnic Studies curriculum, race and schooling. With the support from family, friends, and mentors she received her PhD in Education at the University of Utah in 2016. Now she is a lecturer at Sacramento State University where she teaches Chican@ Studies courses. She also is the director of parent/family organizing for South Stockton Schools Initiative in Stockton, California.

Hector Lara, Executive Director, Reinvent South Stockton Coalition

Hector is a social worker by training who has spent 16 years as a professional in the non-profit sector in the fields of civic engagement, community development, health, youth development, behavioral health, policy, program development, and social services administration in communities throughout California and in Massachusetts. Hector was born in Mexico but grew up in California’s Central Valley in Atwater. He currently serves as the Executive Director for the Reinvent South Stockton Coalition and the South Stockton Promise Zone, a role he has held for nearly 3 years. Hector holds a Masters of Social Work and a Masters of Public Administration from the University of Southern California (USC) and a BA in Comparative Politics from U.C. San Diego.

Dr. Michelle Anderson, Professor, School of Law, Stanford

Michelle Wilde Anderson is a public law scholar and practitioner focused on state and local government, including urban policy, city planning, local democracy, and public finance. Her work combines legal analysis with the details of human experience to understand the local governance of high poverty areas, both urban and rural, and the legal causes of concentrated poverty and fiscal crisis. Her current research explores legal restructuring (such as bankruptcy, disincorporation, and receiverships) for cities and counties in distress—issues that affect not only Rust Belt capitals such as Detroit, but also post-industrial cities in California, rural areas in Oregon, and small towns across the Northeast and South. These issues are examined in her recent publications including “The New Minimal Cities,” Yale Law Journal (2014); “Detroit: What a City Owes its Residents,” Los Angeles Times (2013); “Making a Regional School District: Memphis City Schools Dissolves into its Suburbs,” Columbia Law Review Sidebar (2012); and “Dissolving Cities,” Yale Law Journal (2012). Prior to joining Stanford Law School in 2014, Anderson was an assistant professor of law at Berkeley Law School. Additionally, she has been a research fellow at the European Commission’s Urban Policy Unit in Brussels, an environmental law fellow at Shute, Mihaly, & Weinberger, and a member of the faculty executive committee of the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at Berkeley Law. She clerked for Judge Guido Calabresi on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Judge Marilyn Hall Patel of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. Anderson is a member of the board of directors of the National Housing Law Project and the East Bay Community Law Center.


2016 Sustainable Urban Systems Symposium

Today’s urban challenges, including extraordinary population growth projected by 2050, presents a unique opportunity to re-envision and re-engineer urban environments for the future so that people and the planet flourish.

In support of this vision, Stanford’s Civil & Environmental Engineering Department has embarked on a Sustainable Urban Systems Initiative to facilitate cross-school conversations, collaborations, and education on urban sustainability.

The Initiative hosted its inaugural Sustainable Urban Systems Symposium at Stanford on June 1, 2016. The Symposium celebrated and showcased the pioneering work produced by students, researchers, and faculty in the past academic year under the broad theme of Sustainable Urban Systems, and sparked conversations and future collaborations within the broader community. Themes covered in the Symposium included:

  1. Sustainability, resilience, and livability in cities

  2. Next-generation infrastructure systems, including the food-water-energy nexus and transportation networks

  3. Project-based learning connecting research, education, and practice in the Bay Area and beyond

Photos and information about the symposium can be viewed below. Slides and posters can be viewed here.

Program Agenda

  • 8:30am - Welcome from the School of Engineering and CEE Department
    • James Leckie, Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering
  • 9:00am - Presentations
    • John Rahaim, Planning Director, City and County of San Francisco
    • Laura Tam, Sustainable Development Policy Director, SPUR
    • Hilary Nixon, Director, Department of Urban and Regional Planning at San Jose State University
  • 10:00am - Panel Discussion on “Connecting Research, Education, and Practice”
    • Rich Lechner, Managing Partner, The INSIGHT Group
    • Laura Tolkoff, San Jose Policy Director, SPUR
    • Hilary Nixon, Director, Department of Urban and Regional Planning at San Jose State University
    • S. Bry Sarté, Founder, Sherwood Design Engineers
    • Mike Lepech, Moderator, Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering
  • 11:30am - Lunch, Student Projects & Research Talks
  • 1:00pm - Closing Remarks
    • Bruce Cain, Director, Bill Lane Center for the American West
  • 1:30pm - Poster Reception in 1st floor Red Atrium

 

Featured Speakers

John S. Rahaim

Planning Director, San Francisco Planning Department
City and County of San Francisco

John Rahaim is the Planning Director for the City and County of San Francisco. Mr. Rahaim is responsible for overseeing long range city planning, development entitlements and environmental reviews for most physical development in San Francisco. He was appointed Planning Director in January 2008.

Since Mr. Rahaim’s arrival, the San Francisco Planning Department has completed several comprehensive neighborhood plans, several neighborhood historic resource surveys, and updates to the City’s general plan. Major initiatives completed under Mr. Rahaim’s direction include the Transit Center District Plan, enabling a new high density core for Downtown San Francisco and the Better Streets Plan, a comprehensive strategy to upgrade the quality of the city’s public realm.

The Planning Department also plays a key role in the city’s strategy to accommodate the state’s High Speed Rail Corridor and regional planning efforts to address the nine-county region’s Sustainable Community Strategy. The ongoing work of the department includes reviews for 8000 projects per year, of which nearly 2000 require detailed review and analysis, more than any city in the US.

Laura Tam

Sustainable Development Policy Director
SPUR

Laura Tam coordinates SPUR's work in five major policy areas: green buildings, water supply, wastewater, energy and climate change. In this role since 2007, she works to improve climate resilience and reduce the environmental footprint of cities. As a thought leader on climate adaptation and water management, she has produced and participated in numerous public programs, citywide task forces, major research reports and advocacy recommending strategies for sea level rise, water efficiency and reuse, green infrastructure and reducing climate-change emissions. 

Laura currently serves on the board of directors of Friends of the Urban Forest, the board of the Green Infrastructure Foundation and the advisory council of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. Prior to working at SPUR, she worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She has a Master’s degree in environmental management from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and a BA in geography from Dartmouth College.

Laura Tolkoff

San Jose Policy Director
SPUR

Laura Tolkoff coordinates SPUR’s planning and policy work in San Jose. Prior to joining SPUR, Laura was a senior planner for energy and the environment at Regional Plan Association (RPA), a nonprofit research, planning and advocacy organization in the New York metropolitan area. There, she managed and led the organization’s energy program and coastal climate resilience portfolio. She co-authored a number of reports and policy studies on the transformation of the power sector, climate resilience and hazard mitigation. Prior to RPA, Laura coordinated a HUD-funded study of mixed-income housing at New York City’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development.

Laura earned a master’s degree in urban and environmental policy and planning from Tufts University and a bachelor’s degree in media studies from the University of California, Berkeley. 

Dr. Hilary Nixon

Chair, Department of Urban & Regional Planning
San José State University

Professor Nixon serves as chair of the Department of Urban & Regional Planning at San José State University. She specializes in environmental planning and policy, and also teaches courses on community planning, history and theory of planning, and policy analysis. Her teaching emphasizes the use of project-based, and community-based learning. Her research interests include household hazardous waste management, particularly electronic waste recycling, and the factors that influence pro-environmental behaviors. In addition, she serves as a Research Associate with the Mineta Transportation Institute where her work focuses primarily on the relationship between transportation and the environment. Dr. Nixon was recognized as “Advisor of the Year” by SJSU’s Student Involvement in 2009 and 2015. Dr. Nixon and her students have also received awards from the California Chapter of the American Planning Association for academic excellence.

Bry Sarté 

Founder
Sherwood Design Engineers

Bry Sarté is an author, professional engineer, academic and nonprofit founder. Fourteen years ago, he started Sherwood Design Engineers, which now has several offices in the United States and has worked on hundreds of leading national and international engineering projects. His work significantly influences contemporary global urban transformation around issues of infrastructure, urban design and ecological systems.  He regularly serves as a lecturer at top universities and conferences around the world, where he discusses applications of ecological engineering to planning, design, and construction. He currently serves on the faculty of Columbia University’s Architecture and Urban Design Program, where he teaches the graduate course, Infrastructure, Resiliency, and Public Space.

As engineer for hundreds of the world's leading sustainable engineering projects, Mr. Sarté’s work responds to global environmental issues addressing the intersection of infrastructure, ecological and urban design. Many of his projects have been the first-of-their kind in applying green infrastructure systems, strategies and concepts. From innovative planning projects on one end of the spectrum to implemented construction projects on the other, much of Sarté's work has been highly integrated, highly collaborative design developed in tandem with the world's leading architecture and landscape architecture firms.

Mr. Sarté has served as the principal in charge for projects that range from the largest private real estate development in the U.S., Hudson Yards in New York, to the award-winning San Francisco Better Streets Plan. Other notable projects include the revitalization of the iconic waterfront Brooklyn Bridge Park, the award winning Greater New Orleans Urban Water Plan, and the 35 sq-km award-winning Baietan Urban Area Plan in the heart of Guangzhou, China. Additionally, he has led the engineering design for numerous completed construction projects that have changed the direction of how we build. The projects range from institutional buildings to civic infrastructure.

Mr. Sarté is the author of the published John Wiley & Sons book, Sustainable Infrastructure: The Guide to Green Engineering and Design, which serves as a comprehensive guide to integrating sustainable strategies into infrastructure planning and design with emphasis on water resource management, site design and land planning. Throughout the book Mr. Sarté highlights the central role that creative engineering integrated into collaborative design processes play in developing the complex solutions needed to affect a sustainable transformation of our built environment. He is currently working with Columbia University’s GSAPP Books on his second book Innovations in Urban Water Infrastructure. This book identifies recommendations for innovative approaches to dealing with water in an urban environment with at critical focus on the United Nations Habitat III.

As chair of the Sustainable Landscape and Engineering Committee at SPUR, (San Francisco Planning and Urban Research) Mr. Sarté works with participants from the Department of Public Works, SFPUC, Department of Parking and Traffic, Urban Forestry Council, Department of the Environment, Planning Department, Alliance for a Clean Waterfront, PG&E, Friends of the Urban Forrest, and other non-profit, designers and community groups. The outcome of their workshops and strategy sessions has helped to define priorities to integrate the stormwater management system, increase tree planting and landscaping, improve the pedestrian environment, improve San Francisco’s natural ecosystems, and increase public awareness of green living through eco-revelatory design.

Bry founded the Sherwood Institute in 2009. The institute is comprised of academic, professional, and government advisors from five countries directing research and innovation at the nexus of critical water and energy issues. The nonprofit’s mission is to safeguard and extend the availability and energy efficiency of the threatened vital fresh water resources in the six developed continents. He currently serves as the founder of this nonprofit.

For Four years, Mr. Sarte has served on the faculty board for Columbia University’s Architecture and Urban Design Program. He teaches the graduate course “Infrastructure, Resilience + Public Space”. This course explores critical issues that describe the role and responses of public space in major cities due to climate change. It provides strategies from both real projects and complementary visions of future development. In addition, Mr. Sarté is working with Columbia University’s GSAPP Books on publishing his second book Innovations in Urban Water Infrastructure. This book identifies recommendations for innovative approaches to dealing with water in an urban environment with at critical focus on the United Nations Habitat III.

Rich Lechner

Managing Partner
The INSIGHT Group

Rich Lechner has spent 30+ years helping organizations leverage technology to address critical business challenges and to change the way the world works. He was a serial entrepreneur and turnaround artist at IBM in a career that spanned the breadth of the IT industry from software to systems to services. He held senior executive positions in development, sales and marketing.

As vice president of Energy & Environment at IBM, he launched a business segment which grew to $4B across a portfolio that included energy efficient IT, intelligent buildings, smart urban infrastructure, and optimization of operations. He led IBM’s internal initiative that resulted in an estimated $180M in annual IT energy savings.

Rich was an adjunct professor at Columbia University's Earth Institute for Environmental Sustainability. Having relocated to San Francisco, he’ll be teaching a course on Smarter Cities at Stanford this summer as part of the Environmental & Water Studies Program.

Dr. James Leckie

C. L. Peck, Class of 1906, Professor of Environmental Engineering
Director, Center for Sustainable Development & Global Competitiveness

Stanford University

Professor James O. Leckie is the C.L. Peck, Class of 1906, Professor of Environmental Engineering and Geological and Environmental Sciences (by courtesy) at Stanford University. He is also Director of the Center for Sustainable Development & Global Competitiveness and Director of the Stanford Environmental & Water Studies Summer Program. His research interests include computational intelligence for smart physical and social infrastructure, using computational learning and optimization tools to (1) better design smart physical infrastructure (transportation systems, urban water systems), and (2) facilitate a class of social services such as knowledge management for social innovation, to integrate social functionality into urban communities.

Professor Leckie is chair of the Sustainable Urban Systems Initiative and has been the faculty advisor for the Sustainable Urban Systems Project: San Jose, a three-quarter-long project-based-learning course which connects interdisciplinary teams of students with municipal partners for real-world urban problem solving.

Dr. Bruce Cain

Spence and Cleone Eccles Family Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West
Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in Humanities and Sciences
Stanford University

The distinguished political scientist Bruce E. Cain is the Spence and Cleone Eccles Family Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West, and Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in Humanities and Sciences. Professor Cain succeeded the Center's founding faculty co-director, David M. Kennedy, and is tasked with carrying on the Center's study of the past, present and future of the American West.

Professor Cain brings a wealth of experience in U.S. and California politics. A pioneer in computer-assisted redistricting, he is a well-known expert on elections, term limits, polling, and the relationships between lobbyists and elected officials. He is a frequently cited source in media coverage of politics. 

 

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